pinit_fg_en_rect_red_20 GEN - Huawei's Microchip Vulnerability Explained
The Huawei P30 Pro motherboard, which uses tech sourced internationally (Picture provided by iFixIt.com)Image copyrightiFixIt
Image caption The Huawei P30 Pro motherboard, which uses tech sourced internationally (Picture provided by iFixIt.com)

Google’s announcement that it was no longer able to work with Huawei is just one repercussion of the US decision to add the Chinese tech giant to its “entity list” of companies American firms cannot work with.

The true impact to Huawei may be enormous. While we often refer to the firm's devices as simply “Chinese”, the reality is much more complicated - it sources parts and expertise from all over the world. The same can be said for the likes of Apple, of course, which relies at least in part on chips created by its rival, Samsung.

To get an idea of how disruptive the US move is, let's take a look at just one component of one device: the motherboard in Huawei’s flagship smartphone, the P30 Pro.

It's a circuit board that is barely the length of a finger - but one that relies on a web of complex supply chains and sourcing to make it possible and affordable.

Image copyrightiFixIt
Image caption One side of the P30 Pro motherboard (picture provided by iFixIt.com)

The P30 Pro’s RF transceivers (1) and audio chip (4, below) are made by HiSilicon, a China-based company wholly owned by Huawei - but that’s where the homegrown tech ends.